AD&D 2nd Edition Rules for Tékumel

Introduction:
(October 24, 2000; originally written for 2nd Edition March 1995)

These rules were originally written for AD&D 1st edition, updated for the second edition, and posted some years ago (thanks, Brett). But the end was cut off, and in the interests of having a complete version available, I've cleaned them up a bit for reposting. When this was first written, the only commercially available rules-set for Tekumel was the long out of print Empire of the Petal Throne (EPT), and AD&D was a logical place to try to bring the game up to date. While AD&D has been replaced by D&D 3e /d20, these rules are being updated because they may help those who are working on a newer conversion.

The rules were based on the first printing of the 2nd edition AD&D PHB and DMG, plus spells from the Tome of Magic. They cannot stand alone. I recommend the following materials:

Empire of the Petal Throne (EPT) Strongly recommended. It has all the information you'll need to run the game in one volume, although it's out of date. The best source for Tekumel information with D&D-like mechanics.
Tekumel Bestiary Recommended. Has more creatures and more information than the lists in EPT, along with more pictures. However the creature stats are not easy to convert to AD&D.
Swords and Glory, Volume 1 (The Sourcebook) Recommended. The best resource for Tekumel. An encyclopedia with all the cultural information. Different Worlds cut it into three volumes for republishing, but only managed to print parts 1 and 2. Tita's House of Games has reprints of the full original.
Swords and Glory, Volume 2 (The Players Handbook) Optional. The character generation, combat, and magic rules for the never completed Swords and Glory game. Useful for the skill lists and the magic system, if you're not going to use AD&D's. Tita's House of Games has reprints available.
Adventures on Tekumel, Volume 1 Optional. The character generation rules used for the Gardasiyal game system. Useful for a skill list, if you're going to use secondary skills.
Gardasiyal, Book 1 Optional. A "lite" version of Swords and Glory. Useful for the very complete buying list.
Gardasiyal, Book 2 Optional. The magic rules for the Gardasiyal system. Useful for the magic system if you're not going to use AD&D's. Much cheaper than Swords and Glory.

 

The Rules:

Character Generation:

Ability Scores:

Roll for Strength, Intelligence, Wisdom, Dexterity, Constitution, Charisma, and Comeliness via whatever AD&D system is considered desirable. Comeliness is added from 1st edition AD&D Unearthed Arcana, p. 6. It is included because physical appearance is very important on Tekumel. If Unearthed Arcana is not available, use the following rules:

Roll 3d6 for Comeliness, and modify it for Charisma:

Charisma Comeliness bonus
< 6 -2
6 - 8 -1
9 - 12 0
13 - 15 +1
> 15 +2
Comeliness may be less than 3 or greater than 18, and these scores make one inhumanly ugly or beautiful. Comeliness will affect reaction rolls for NPCs just like Charisma, so charismatic, good-looking PCs will have a double bonus. You could also ignore comeliness and stick to charisma alone. In this case, keep in mind that charisma must also simulate physical appearance.

 

Possible Non-human PC Races:

(See EPT, The Tekumel Sourcebook Vol. 1, or the Tekumel Bestiary for more information.)

N'luss: +1 Str, -1 Int, -1 Dex, +2 Con, -1 Cha*, base AC 10, 1 HD. (Actually, N'luss are a subtype of human.)

Ahoggya: +2 Str, -1 Int, -2 Dex, +2 Con, -5 Cha* (minimum 1), base AC 6, 3 HD. Ahoggya have two attacks per round (against different targets if they are man-sized, or they may be against the same target if larger) at no penalty, and may have four attacks per round if surrounded.

Hlaka: +1 Dex, -2 Cha*, base AC 10, 1 HD.

Pachi Lei: -1 Cha*, base AC 10, 1 HD. Pachi Lei can see in the dark, and has a 30% chance of detecting ambushes, secret doors, etc. This rises to 50% if the character is actively searching for these things.

Pe Choi: +1 Dex, -1 Con, base AC 11, 1 HD. Pe Choi get two attacks per round against the same or different foes at a lesser penalty than humans (see below), and they have excellent hearing permitting an 80% chance of detecting secret doors and ambushes. This rises to 90% if the creature is actively searching. They heal wounds at only 75% the human rate, regardless if this is due to spell or rest.

Pygmy Folk: -1 Str, +2 Dex, -1 Con, -2 Cha*, base AC 11, 1/2 HD. They can see in the dark, and have better hearing than the Pe Choi, although at short range.

Shen: +2 Str, -1 Int, -2 Dex, +2 Con, -2 Cha*, base AC 8, 3 HD. Shen get an extra attack per round behind them by using their tail. Their tail does 1d4 damage. Notice that this is semi-involuntary, and friendly figures behind them may be struck.

Swamp Folk: +1 Con, base AC 10, 1 HD. Swamp folk are able to sense "wrongness", such as a change in direction, a slope, dimensional nexus points, etc.

Tinaliya: -2 Str, +1 Int, +1 Dex, -1 Cha*, base AC 11, 1/2 HD.

Urunen: +1 Int, -1 Con, base AC 10, 1 HD.

Notes:

  • Races with an * after Charisma means this modification has no effect when the character is dealing with others of the same species.
  • Only Pe Choi use their comeliness score when dealing with humans.
  • The hit dice score indicates the number of hit dice for first level characters. When characters attain a new level, they get one full hit die normal to their character class.
  • Yes, those are armor classes of 11 for some creatures. Treat it as AC 10, but the opponent gets an additional +1 to hit.

Race and character class: Non-human races are limited in how high a level they may reach in their character class.

Race Max. Warrior Level Max Cleric/Wizard Level
N'luss 12* 5**
Ahoggya 12* 4****
Hlaka 12 12***
Pachi Lei 12 12
Pe Choi 12 12**
Pygmy Folk 9 12
Shen 12* 6
Swamp Folk 12
Tinaliya 9 12*
Urunen 12 12

* A high prime requisite allows higher limits:

Prime Requisite Maximum level
14-15 13
16-17 14
18 15
19 16

** Pé Chói spell-casters can add one to their maximum attainable level on the prime requisite increase table.
*** Hláka spell-casters must be shamans.

**** Shamans may be one level higher than wizards or clerics.

Author's Notes: The Five Empires are human-centric. Non-humans are purposely limited to make them less attractive as characters. Most non-human NPCs have unlimited advancement in their own lands. However, Pygmy Folk and Tinaliya cannot exceed 9th level warrior due to their physical limitations, and N'luss, Ahoggya, and Shen spell-casters cannot exceed their racial maximum for spell casters because they're just not very good with magic.

Character Classes:

There are three character classes available to players: Warriors, Wizards, and Clerics.

Warriors: Warriors are simply fighters, no other classes allowed—no rangers and no paladins. Warriors must have a minimum strength of 9. I don't have access to the "kits" from the various character handbooks to choose which fit the setting. Individual DMs must decide which kits to use, but I recommend the following roles:

  • Soldiers.
  • Gladiators from the Hirilakte arenas.
  • Bodyguards.
  • Police (tomb police, temple guards, Sakbe road guards, etc.)
  • Secret agents (Omnipotent Azure Legion). [This should not be open to low-level PCs.]

Outside of the Five Empires, things are more flexible. You might consider barbarians (perfect for N'luss warriors) or other uncivilized, outdoorsy types. In any case, only the most unusual warriors will have access to either spells or spell-like abilities, if any of the kits permit these.

Spell Casters:

In the AD&D game, Wizards cast spells by arcane knowledge and possibly innate ability. Once they know how magic works, they can memorize spells and cast them. Clerics use a different form of magic, where their powers are granted to them by their god or the god's intermediaries. On Tekumel, all magic works the same way, through knowledge and ability. The gods do not grant powers. (However, most magical knowledge is controlled by the temples of the gods, so that one can only learn magic by joining a temple as a priest.) There is no real reason to have separate Wizards and Clerics: in a sense, all spell-casters are both.

But somehow AD&D doesn't seem right with only one spell-casting class. Luckily, there are two different kinds of spell-casters in the Five Empires, and they fulfill different roles. Some spell-casters stay close to their temple, and ascend the scholarly hierarchy. They get the temple's support, and in exchange, they work to achieve the temple's goals. These are the sorcerer-priests. Other spell-casters dislike this role, and become more independent. While still faithful to their temple (otherwise, they would not be able to learn more magic), they work on their own, so that they have more freedom, but less support from the temple. These are the lay-priests. We can treat the sorcerer-priests as Clerics, and the lay-priests as Wizards.

I offer two ways to game Clerics and Wizards. One is more AD&D-like, with bigger differences between the classes. The other is more Tekumel-like, with smaller differences.

1. More AD&D: Simply use ordinary wizard and cleric rules:

Wizards get d4 for hit dice, when they go up a level they get one new spell to enter in their spell book, and to learn more spells they must pay a tutor or find a magic scroll (or steal somebody else's spell books). Spells are memorized by sleep and then studying the spell book. Weapons proficiency is limited to dagger, dart, staff, knife, or sling. Notice that there are no "mages" or "specialist" wizards, as such: wizard characters must choose a deity or cohort to worship, and they get to learn the spells appropriate to that deity. You should not use the intelligence table to see if a Wizard can learn a spell: their lists are too depleted to allow them to fail to learn one.

Clerics get d8 for hit dice, when they go up a level they gain access to all of the spells appropriate to their level. Spells are memorized by sleep and meditation or prayer. Blunt weapons only are permitted, unless the cleric is a worshipper of Karakan or Vimuhla (or their cohorts).

2. A more Tekumelani system: There is little difference between lay-priests and sorcerer-priests on Tekumel. The magic they use is the same. Further, in game mechanics terms, there is less reason to differentiate Wizards and Clerics because the Wizards have such short spell lists. Therefore, the two classes will play very similarly.

Both Wizards and Clerics advance using the Wizard experience table. Both Wizards and Clerics get d6 hit dice, up to a maximum of 9d6, with +2 hit points per level thereafter. Wizards use the Wizard spell-progression table, while Clerics use the Cleric spell-progression table (tables 21 and 24 in the 2nd edition PHB, pp. 30 and 33). Wizards learn one new spell when they go up a level, and Clerics learn two. Wizards are limited to the maximum number of spells per level that their intelligence allows (table 2, p. 16 PHB), but they don't have to roll to see if they can learn a spell: their lists are too depleted to allow spells to be never learnable. Clerics are not limited in the maximum number of spells they can learn, but they must use the % of spell failure table based on their wisdom (table 5, p. 17 PHB). Clerics may have bonus spells due to high wisdom. Both Wizards and Clerics may hire tutors, find scrolls, etc. to learn additional spells. Neither Wizards nor Clerics need spell-books: when they learn a spell, they know how to cast it. Spell books are used exclusively as teaching instruments here. Spells are memorized by sleep and meditation. Both Wizards and Wizards and Clerics are limited to weapons proficiency in daggers, darts, staff, and knives, unless they are worshippers of Karakan, Vimuhla, or their cohorts, in which case they may learn whatever weapon they choose.

 

Regardless of which system you use, Wizards may wear leather armor, but not use a shield. Clerics are limited to leather armor if they want to cast spells, but may wear heavier armor if they are not casting. Clerics of the war gods and their cohorts (Karakan, Chegarra, Vimuhla, and Chiteng) are permitted to use whatever weapons they want, including swords.

Wizards have intelligence as their prime requisite (minimum of 9 required) and Clerics have wisdom as their prime requisite (minimum of 9 required). Clerics may be permitted experience points when they perform deeds that advance their temple's or their deity's interests. (Wizards don't care about such things.)

No matter which system is used, Clerics do not have the ability to turn or command undead unless they are clerics of Ksarul, Gruganu, Sarku, Durritlamish, Belkhanu, or Qon. Clerics of Belkhanu or Qon can only turn undead, they cannot command them.

Clerics are more powerful than wizards at low levels, but wizards still have more powerful spells at the very highest levels.

I do not recommend using kits for clerics or wizards, as the unusual background of spell-casting on Tekumel would make many kits inappropriate. Without knowing what they are, however, I cannot make specific judgments. It is up to the DM as to which kits are appropriate.

Use Tekumel's magic system: There is a third option to handling magic. One of the most striking features of gaming on Tekumel is the wonderful collection of spells from Swords and Glory and Gardasiyal. (Gardasiyal is a less-detailed version of Swords and Glory.) A DM may choose to use these magic systems instead of AD&D's. To use Gardasiyal's magic system, use the rules below:

There is no difference between Wizards and Clerics; all spell casters are Sorcerers. Sorcerers are essentially AD&D Wizards, using the Wizard experience table for advancement. Hit dice are d6, with a maximum of 9 hit dice, with +2 hit points per level thereafter. Sorcerers gain 25 spell points to buy spells each time they go up a level. Sorcerers may wear whatever armor they wish, but if they want to cast spells, they must wear nothing heavier than leather armor. When in doubt, consider sorcerers to be wizards.

 

Shamans: The "barbarian" peoples outside of the Five Empires do not have the temples to teach spell-casting. Instead, they use a master-apprentice system, and their magic is more nature-oriented. Shamans thus use different spell lists than peoples from the Five Empires. Shamans may be either Clerics or Wizards. However, there are big problems using Shaman PCs. Unless they return to their distant homes each time they go up a level, they will find it difficult to be trained in their next spell, and if they choose to join a temple to learn magic, they will stop learning Shaman magic. It is strongly recommended that shamans be limited to NPCs.

 

Other character classes

Priests and Warrior-Priests: A player may choose to be a non-spell casting priest of one of the temples. Such a priest could have religious and political power, but no adventuring ability: no armor, no weapons, no spells...not much fun for most players. Players may also choose to be warrior-priests, warriors affiliated with their temple. Such characters have the advantage of gaining experience points for performing deeds that advance their temple's or their deity's interests. The disadvantage is that such characters are now going to be restricted by the orders that the temple will give them, and they will have less freedom of movement. Warrior-priests may use whatever weapons or armor they like: they are simply warriors with close ties to their temples. Warrior priests are most common to the temples of the war gods: Karakan and Chegarra, Vimuhla and Chiteng.

Rogues: Tekumel has no bardic tradition, so bards are not permitted. Thieves may be allowed, but only under special circumstances. Unlike most AD&D settings, the Five Empires have organized police and secret police forces. Any attempts to create a "thieves guild" would be ruthlessly stamped out. This makes training to be a thief difficult. Without the political protection a thieves guild has (at the very least, without its ability to pay enormous bribes to the police forces to be left unmolested) an individual thief who made a career out of robbing the rich would be caught in short order, and their fate would make an example for others considering such a career. This limits thieves to robbing the poor, which is an unsatisfying career for a PC, and there's not much money in it. Further, given the social stratification of the Five Empires, thieves would not be likely to associate with wizards, priests, or high-level warriors; in short, it would be very difficult to create and maintain a standard AD&D-type party with a thief!

There are two exceptions in Tsolyanu that may be considered "thieves organizations." The first exception is the Assassin's clans: The Black Y Society, The Association of the Relievers of Life, and The Clan of Whispered Fear. PCs who wished to be an assassin would find their lives very constrained: targets would be selected by the clan elders, and individual initiative would be discouraged. It wouldn't be much of a game for players to simply receive their assignments, and then track their target and beat, main, or kill him or her. Outsiders are almost never invited to join an assassin's clan, and upstart rivals who don't belong to the three clans mentioned above would be stopped by means legal and illegal. This is not a good option for PCs. The other exception is the career of tomb robber.

While tomb robbing is never legal and never accepted, there are clans, at least in Tsolyanu, that are widely believed to practice the trade. These clans are very low status, and are scorned by more respectable folk. Those who raid the tombs have the tomb police to deal with, as well as the other, more dangerous guardians of the necropolis! Should a DM decide to permit tomb robbers as a character class, they should not permit a pick pocket skill, as this is not what tomb robbers learn to do. Tomb robbers wear no armor—they are not warriors. Their weapons proficiencies are limited to dagger, knife, club, and shortsword. They do not get backstab abilities. The DM must decide if any kits are appropriate. Tomb robbers might be allowed to make up a party with similarly low-class warriors to despoil the Underworlds, but sorcerers would be virtually unheard of. In fact, if tomb robbers invaded temple precincts in the underworlds, they could expect to be hunted by sorcerers of those temples.

At the DMs option, PCs may choose to be street-thieves: footpads, etc. These characters also do not get the backstab option, and many not wear armor (too noticeable on the streets), and are limited to weapon proficiencies such as knives, daggers, and clubs. They may be allowed to pick pockets. However, this is does not offer much for a game:

  • If the band becomes too large, too successful, or both, the authorities will move to shut them down, and make examples of these people.
  • If the band makes a habit of robbing rich citizens (where the money is), they will be hunted down very quickly.
  • Street thieves are at the very bottom of the social order. Such individuals will never participate in the social or political parts of life on Tekumel.
  • Street thieves are unlikely to thrive as a party. Warriors make a group too organized (hello, impalement stake), and sorcerers are just plain out of the question.

The only exception I can see to the "no sorcerers with thieves rule" is if a party of thieves manages to convince a naive foreigner new to Tsolyanu to join them in their exploits. This foreigner is either not from the Five Empires (so probably a shaman), or just doesn't care about improving their life (such as if they were kicked out their temple in their native land or something like that). Notice that such sorcerers are going to find it next to impossible to find a tutor to go up levels. In short, I have provided rules to permit thieves, but the setting discourages it, and so do I.

No split classes are allowed. No cleric-thieves, no cleric-wizards, no fighter-clerics, no wizard-warriors, etc. Dual class characters are similarly unheard of. You can't drop being a warrior and decide to become a sorcerer: you are now too old to train, and vice versa. The only combination allowed is warrior-priest (that is, warriors dedicated to their temple, with no spell-casting ability).

Alignment

Stability and Change only. These are related to AD&D's Law and Chaos alignments, but not exactly. Change is just as organized as Stability. Stability believes the individual should work for the betterment of society, so that all benefit. Change believes socieity exists to serve the individual. Unfortunately, AD&D's spell lists are oriented to Good and Evil (there is no "protection against Chaos" spell), so for the purposes of spell-casting, consider "Good" to mean "Stability", and "Evil" to mean "Change".

It is important to realize that the Tsolyani do not care about Good and Evil so much as they do about "Noble Action." Noble action refers to being true to one's beliefs, and striving to fulfill them. A priest of Vimuhla who sacrifices a victim on his fiery altar is acting just as nobly as a priest of Thumis who lays flowers on his altar.

 

Proficiencies

Non-Weapon Proficiencies: If non-weapon proficiencies are to be used, the skill lists from Swords and Glory (section 2.239) or Adventures on Tekumel, Vol 1 is recommended.

Weapon Proficiencies: Use AD&D weapons proficiency rules, but specialization is only permitted after a warrior reaches 6th level. Warriors may obtain proficiency in any weapon they choose. Wizards and Clerics are restricted to the weapon proficiencies the PHB allows their classes. Wizards and Clerics of the temples of Vimuhla, Chiteng, Karakan, and Chegarra may learn to use any weapons. Wizards are permitted to try to use any weapon they want, but they will pay the -5 non-proficiency penalty. Clerics may not use edged weapons at all unless members of the temples of the war gods and their cohorts, as mentioned above.

Author's Notes: The weapons specialization rule is one I use for standard AD&D rules. The original purpose of weapon specialization was to make regular fighters attractive to play relative to paladins, rangers, cavaliers, and barbarians. With the removal of these latter two classes from the 2nd edition AD&D rules, the need for specialization was eliminated, yet the rule was kept. My feeling is that it makes warriors too strong at the lower levels, but at the mid-to high level range, keeps them on a par with the wizards. If the DM chooses to permit specialization at 1st level, I recommend against allowing low-level Shen or Ahoggya warriors to choose this option, lest nobody play human warriors!

Weapons found on Tékumel are:

Battle axe Dagger Quarterstaff
Blowgun (dart) Dart Sling (bullet or stone)
Bow, Composite long "Footman's" Flail (large) Spear
Bow, Composite short "Footman's" Mace (large) Staff Sling
Bow, short, self "Horseman's" Flail (small) Sword, long
Bow, long, Séresh wood "Horseman's" Mace (small) Sword, scimitar
Club Javelin Sword, short
Crossbow, hand (Shén only) Knife Sword, two-handed
Crossbow, light Morning star Warhammer
Crossbow, heavy Polearm (all but Mancatcher)  

Other Tékumel weapons not found in AD&D

  Weight (lbs) Size Type Speed

Damage, S-M

Damage, L
Bola 3 S B 6 1-3 1-2
Crossbow, Medium 10 M P 8 1d4 1d4+1
Flail, Two-handed 15 L B 10 1d8+2 2d8
Mace, Two-handed 15 L B 10 1d10 1d8

Bolas will entangle and fell an opponent unless the victim saves vs. breath weapon. Entanglement will last for 1 round during which the victim has no dexterity bonuses and counts as "stunned and prone" (+4 to be hit). Bolas generally only work on size M or smaller creatures, usually bipeds (unless legs necessary for balance are close enough together). (Taken from DRAGON #61).

Steel piercing and slashing weapons are automatically +1 to hit and +1 damage even without enchantment. Excellent steel piercing and slashing weapons are +2 to hit and +2 damage without enchantment. Any enchantments are added on to this base. Bludgeon weapons don't get this bonus. If a steel bludgeon weapon is enchanted, only the enchantment bonus is added: there is never any bonus added to bludgeon weapons merely for being made of steel.

Armor:

Armor Type Armor Class Rating
None 10
Shield only 9
Leather or padded armor 8
Leather or padded armor + shield 7
Scale mail 6
Scale mail + shield, chainmail 5
Chainmail + shield, banded mail, lamellar armor 4
Banded mail, lamellar armor + shield 3

If the armor is made of steel, its armor class is improved by one; in effect, it becomes +1 armor. Armor made of excellent steel is the equivalent of +2. These bonuses apply to shields, also. Any enchantments added to the armor are added to the +1, so that the weakest of enchanted armors (enchanted to +1 and made of ordinary steel) is +2. Notice that Chlen-hide armor cannot be enchanted.

Use the appropriate Tekumel equipment list for armor costs rather than AD&D's equipment prices. S&G and Gardasiyal's equipment lists are preferable to EPT, but EPT should be used instead of AD&D's lists if that's all you have.

Padded armor is generally found in the extreme north, or it is used by peasants who cannot afford any better. Leather armor is the equivalent of S&G light infantry armor (light helmet, breastplate/pectoral, vambraces, and a leather tunic). Scale and chain mail are common: they are made of scraps of Chlen hide. Scale mail is more popular among the N'luss, while chainmail is more common in the Five Empires. If you are using the S&G or Gardasiyal equipment list, consider both chainmail and scale armor as medium infantry armor (medium helmet, gorget, breast and back plate, vambraces, and greaves). Lamellar armor is not usually available for PC's: it will be found in Pechano, Yan Kor, and eastern Salarvya. Banded armor is the equivalent of heavy infantry armor (heavy helmet, gorget collar, breast and back plates, vambraces, greaves, mail kit, tasses, and sabatons).

If you are limited to EPT's equipment list, consider padded armor to cost as leather armor; scale mail costs 38 K, and banded or lamellar armor is plate armor. Note that each armor assumes a helmet is worn. Characters may insist on wearing a heavier, lighter, or no helmet. Lighter or heavier helmets make no difference in combat, but no helmet means worsening armor class by one and could mean a lucky hit to the head for more damage and possible stunning.

Nonhumans and Armor: Each race has its own kinds of armor. To simplify the game, consider them as wearing human armor, but if the armor class of the armor they wear is less than their own natural armor class, consider their armor class to be 1 better than their natural armor class. Armor 2 or more classes below natural armor class of the creature is of no value, with the exception of shields. Some races will not wear armor. They are: Hlaka, Hlutrgu, Nyagga, Shunned Ones, and Grey Ssu. Of these races, the latter two will carry shields.

Combat

Use unmodified AD&D rules.

 

Magic

As noted above, magic works differently on Tekumel.

Learning magic: As mentioned above, in the Five Empires, all magic is learned through the temples, and they guard this oligopoly jealously. Some spells are known by all temples, some by a few, and some are secrets known to only one temple. Generally, the higher level the spell, the more likely it is to be a temple secret. Under no circumstances will the temples permit an outsider to learn their magic. Any teacher who violates this rule will be hunted down and punished in the most horrible way that can be imagined. If a spell-caster chooses to switch religions and join a different temple, his or her memory will first be wiped clean by the temple's most senior spell-casters first.

There is no "magic script" for Tekumel. Spells are written in ordinary languages, although these languages may be ancient, obscure, or unknown. If you find a book that contains spells, you need to discover what language it's written in, and you may need a scholar of that language to decipher it for you. An exception to this are enchanted scrolls, which carry spells that may be read and cast right off the scroll. These have minor magics on them that make the script unreadable except by a follower of that religion. So, to use a magic scroll discovered in a disused chamber in the Underworld, one must find a scholar of the right faith who reads that language and can translate it for you. Thus, the "Read Magic" spell is useless, and has been deleted.

Magic on Tekumel is disrupted by metal. Spell-casters who attempt to cast a spell while carrying more than a couple of ounces of metal run the risk of unpleasant effects. The spell may simply fail, suck spells out of the memory of the caster, cause 2d6 damage to the caster, or light their head on fire. Chlen hide does not cause this problem, nor do "Eyes". Notice that metal attached to the caster by a rope, or in an extradimensional pocket, will still disrupt spells. Incidentally, Chlen-hide armor disrupts spell casting by interfering with freedom of movement, which makes it impossible to go through the correct gestures and poses.

The AD&D material components do not work on Tekumel. Many are too silly, some are simply unavailable. Instead, require spell-casters to pay 150 K each adventure for a refill to their "sorcerer's chest", which contains all the substances they'll need for most spells. In addition, holy symbols are not needed for Clerical magic.

The AD&D spell lists have been broken into groups for each Temple. A spell-caster may only learn spells from their temple list, whether a Cleric or a Wizard. Spells were taken from the Players Handbook and the Tome of Magic. There are no "Wild Magic" spells, no magic surges, no random effects. Many AD&D spells that were reversible are not any more. All spells summoning monsters, shadows, etc., have been deleted, along with spells about riding. There are no riding animals in the Five Empires, so wizards would not have developed this magic. There are also no elementals on Tekumel, so these spells have been deleted.

Every temple has allied "demons". Stability demons are only described in the Swords and Glory spell list; for our purposes, consider them the same as Change demons, but hostile to Change. As currently written, these rules consider demons difficult to summon, and the Gate spell is the only one used. You may choose to permit lesser-powered demons into the game. In this case, use the summon elemental spells, and call the elementals demons. Be sure to specify which elements are summoned by which temple, and don't allow any temple access to all four elements.

Tekumel has rich connections to other planes, but not in AD&D terms. There's no Astral, Ethereal, Inner, Outer, or Shadow Planes; instead there is a swarming infinity of "Demon Planes" around the Tekumel universe. In AD&D, one travels to other planes via the Astral or Ethereal plane; on Tekumel, one travels via "Nexus Points", which are more like AD&D's Gate spell, in that they go directly from one plane to another. However, there is no guarantee that a Nexus Point will take you to your destination—you must step from plane to plane, traversing a series of Nexus Points to get to where you want. Thus, even if you simply want to get to another place on Tekumel, 100 miles away, you may have to cross five demon planes in order to get there. Any AD&D spell referring to planar travel, or the Astral or Ethereal plane, must be modified. "Contact Higher Plane", for example, simply contacts either one's deity, or one of the lesser races serving him/her. You don't specify the plane you request information from so much as the being you request information from. There is a spell of Belkhanu's temple in the S&G/Gardasiyal rules that permits Astral travel: this is not like AD&D's astral travel. There is no astral plane in Tekumel's universe. An astral character becomes insubstantial and transparent, and can travel far distances more quickly than normally. At higher levels, the astral character may cross Nexus Points or go to other planes. There are no astral monsters, no astral vortexes, or other hazards of astral travel. You won't need the Manual of the Planes for Tekumel!

Clerical Spells

Clerics must choose their deity or cohort to worship. For our purposes, there is no difference between priests of a deity or a cohort; in practice there would be a host of minor differences. Clerics get to choose spells from both their deity's sphere and the All and Healing spheres. The Raise Dead spell is likewise available to all clerics, regardless of deity. Shaman clerics also gain access to the All and Healing spheres, as well as the Raise Dead spell.

Deity Worshipped Spheres for spells
All All, Healing, Raise Dead spell
Stability

Hnalla, Dra
Karakan, Chegarra
Thumis, Ketengku
Avanthe, Dilinala
Belkhanu, Qon

Sun, Law, Protection
Combat, War*
Divination, Thought
Elemental Air, Elemental Water, Weather*
Astral, Guardian*
Change
Hru'u, Wuru
Vimuhla, Chiteng
Ksarul, Gruganu
Sarku, Durritlamish
Dlamelish, Hrihayal

Special*
Combat, Elemental Fire, War
Thought*
Necromantic*
Chaos, Charm

Shaman Animal, Plant

* NOTES

Clerics of Karakan and Chegarra also get to use the 1st level Wizard spell Magic Missile and the 3rd level Wizard spell Lightning Bolt as though they were clerical spells. They may also have proficiency in any weapon they choose.

Clerics of Avanthe and Dilinala may also choose any 4 spells to learn from the Plant and/or Animal clerical spheres. That's a total of 4 spells, not 4 spells per level.

Clerics of Belkhanu and Qon also have the Undead Ward spell from the Wards sphere.

Clerics of Hru'u have no spells for their appropriate sphere (Chaos, Darkness, Cold), so they pick spells from the special list below (as well as from the All list above) [Yes, there is a Chaos Sphere, but most of the spells seemed inappropriate.]

Clerics of Vimuhla and Chiteng also get to use the 3rd level Wizard spell Fireball as if it were a clerical spell. They also may have proficiency in any weapon they choose.

Clerics of Ksarul and Gruganu also get the Summon Insects and Creeping Doom clerical spells from the Animal sphere.

Clerics of Sarku and Durritlamish may also use Wizard spells of the Necromantic school as though they were clerical spells. They may NOT use the following spells: Cantrip, Summon Shadow, Bloodstone's Spectral Steed, Reincarnation, Control Undead, and Intensify Summoning.

Spell List for Clerics of Hru'u

1st Level Spells

Detect Evil (Detect Stability ONLY)
Endure Cold Light (Darkness ONLY) Protection from Evil (Protection from Stability ONLY)
Sanctuary

5th Level Spells

Spike Stones
Transmute Rock to Mud
Age Object
Barrier of Retention
Grounding
Mindshatter

2nd Level Spells

Enthrall
Hold Person
Obscurement
Resist Cold
Withdraw
Dissension's Feast
Draw Upon Holy Might
Hesitation
Sanctify

6th Level Spells

Heal/Harm
Forbiddence (Alignment different in respect to Law and Chaos ONLY)
Transmute Water to Dust (No reverse)
Age Creature
Crushing Walls
Spiritual Wrath

3rd Level Spells

Continual Light (Darkness ONLY)
Cure Blindness or Deafness (Cause Blindness or Deafness ONLY)
Prayer
Remove Curse (Reversible)
Miscast Magic
Unearthly Choir

7th Level Spells

Confusion
Succor
Symbol (of Hopelessness and Pain ONLY)
Tentacle Walls

4th Level Spells

Abjure
Control Temperature, 10' r (Make colder ONLY)
Protection from Evil, 10' r (Protection from Stability ONLY)
Protection from Lightning
Chaotic Sleep
Inverted Ethics (Use of this spell is a violation of the Concordat! It must only be used when the caster is not in a civilized area)
Mental Domination
Solipsism

 

 

Wizard spells

Wizard spells are not broken down by schools. Instead, they are divided by subject matter. As for Clerics, Wizards must choose a deity to worship, as their choice of spells will depend on their deity. Wizards may learn spells from their deity's list and the All list. As noted above, wizards are not permitted to choose spells from other temple lists no matter what the circumstance, nor may they ever cast spells from other temples, even if they find a scroll. Note that some spells are duplicated, and may be learned and used by different temples; this is okay. Spells from the Tome of Magic are at the end of each list.

Deity: All

1st Level Spells

Dancing Lights
Detect Magic
Hold Portal
Phantasmal Force
Sleep
Unseen Servant
Wizard Mark
Lasting Breath
Metamorphose Liquids (No potions! No holy water!)

4th Level Spells

Improved Invisibility
Minor Globe of Invulnerability
Remove Curse (Reversable)
Stoneskin

7th Level Spells

Banishment
Mass Invisibility

2nd Level Spells

Bind
Blur
Deeppockets (A wizard or cleric wearing such a garment with metal in the pockets will still have spells interfered with)
Knock
Know Alignment (Usually unnecessary; most people wear symbols of their faith; Note that it is ignoble to use the reverse)
Improved Phantasmal Force
Invisibility
Levitate
Magic Mouth
Wizard Lock

5th Level Spells

Avoidance
Dismissal
Telekinesis

8th Level Spells

Binding
Mind Blank
Permanency

3rd Level Spells

Blink
Clairaudience
Clairvoyance
Dispel Magic
Infravision
Invisibility, 10' r
Protection from Normal Missiles
Wizard Sight

6th Level Spells

Anti-Magic Shell
Enchant an Item
Ensnarement
Geas
Globe of Invulnerability

9th Level Spells

Gate

 

The Stability Gods

Deity: Hnalla/Dra

1st Level Spells

Light (No reverse)
Protection from Evil (Protection from Change, no reverse)

4th Level Spells

Confusion
Illusionary Wall
Magic Mirror
Vacancy
Wizard Eye
Divination
Enhancement

7th Level Spells

Limited Wish
Prismatic Spray
Teleport Without Error

2nd Level Spells

Detect Evil (Detect Change, no reverse)
Continual Light
Tasha's Uncontrollable Hideous Laughter

5th Level Spells

Advanced Illusion
Domination
Feeblemind
Sending
Shadow Magic
Teleport
Wall of Force
Mind Fog

8th Level Spells

Prismatic Wall
Gunther's Kaleidoscopic Strike

3rd Level Spells

Haste
Lightning Bolt
Protection from Evil, 10' r (Protection from Change, no reverse)
Spectral Force

6th Level Spells

Chain Lightning
Demi-Shadow Magic
Glassee
Mirage Arcana
Mislead
Permanent Illusion
Programmed Illusion
Project Image
True Seeing
Veil

9th Level Spells

Prismatic Sphere
Wish

 

Deity: Karakan/Chegarra

1st Level Spells

Armor
Enlarge (No reverse)
Magic Missile
Shield
Shocking Grasp
Tenser's Floating Disk
Fist of Stone

4th Level Spells

Enchanted Weapon
Emotion (Courage, Hope only)
Fumble
Shout
Thunderstaff
Turn Pebble to Boulder

7th Level Spells

Mordenkainen's Sword
Power Word, Stun

2nd Level Spells

Melf's Acid Arrow
Mirror Image
Shatter
Strength
Hornung's Baneful Deflector

5th Level Spells

Wall of Iron

8th Level Spells

Power Word, Blind

3rd Level Spells

Flame Arrow
Haste
Lightning Bolt
Augmentation
Spirit Armor

6th Level Spells

Chain Lightning
Tenser's Transformation

9th Level Spells

Power Word, Kill
Wail of the Banshee

 

Deity: Thumis/Ketengku

1st Level Spells

Comprehend Languages (No reverse)
Identify
Mending
Hornung's Guess

4th Level Spells

Leomund's Secure Shelter
Rary's Mnemonic Enhancer
Dilation I
Dimension Door
Extension I
Far Reaching II
Locate Creature
Minor Spell Turning
Otiluke's Resilient Sphere
Shadow Monsters

7th Level Spells

Mordenkainen's Magnificent Mansion
Phase Door
Spell Turning
Vision

2nd Level Spells

ESP
Locate Object (No reverse)
Past Life
Protection from Paralysis

5th Level Spells

Contact Other Plane
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Domination Extension II
Leomund's Lamentable Belaborment
Leomund's Secret Chest
Sending
Wall of Force
Far Reaching III
Lower Resistance

8th Level Spells

Clone
Serten's Spell Immunity
Symbol

3rd Level Spells

Leomund's Tiny Hut
Slow Tongues (No reverse)
Alamir's Fundamental Breakdown
Far Reaching I
Squaring the Circle

6th Level Spells

Contingency
Glassee
Legend Lore
Mordenkainen's Lucubration
Shades
Stone to Flesh
Augmentation II
Dilation II

9th Level Spells

Foresight
Succor
Chain Contingency

 

Deity: Avanthe/Dilinala

1st Level Spells

Change Self
Feather Fall
Murdock's Feathery Flyer

4th Level Spells

Emotion (Friendship, Happiness only)
Fumble
Hallucinatory Terrain
Otiluke's Resilient Sphere
Solid Fog
Shadow Monsters

7th Level Spells

Bigby's Grasping Hand
Charm Plants
Reverse Gravity

2nd Level Spells

Alter Self
Ride the Wind

5th Level Spells

Airy Water
Bigby's Interposing Hand
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Transmute Rock to Mud

8th Level Spells

Bigby's Clenched Fist
Otiluke's Telekinetic Sphere

3rd Level Spells

Fly
Gust of Wind
Slow
Water Breathing (No reverse)
Wind Wall

6th Level Spells

Bigby's Forceful Hand
Control Weather
Lower Water
Move Earth (No earth elementals needed)
Part Water
Shades
Stone to Flesh
Transmute Water to Dust

9th Level Spells

Bigby's Crushing Hand
Temporal Stasis

 

Deity: Belkhanu/Qon

1st Level Spells

Detect Undead
Tenser's Floating Disk

4th Level Spells

Confusion
Illusionary Wall
Shadow Monsters
Vacancy

7th Level Spells

Drawmij's Instant Summons
Shadow Walk (but caster is walking via Nexus Points, not the Plane of Shadow; otherwise all is identical.)
Vanish

2nd Level Spells

Detect Invisibility
Past Life

5th Level Spells

Advanced Illusion
Bigby's Interposing Hand
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Domination
Feeblemind
Leomund's Secret Chest
Shadow Magic
Wall of Force
Mind Fog

8th Level Spells

Trap the Soul
Hornung's Random Dispatcher

3rd Level Spells

Fly
Haste
Hold Undead
Spectral Force

6th Level Spells

Bigby's Forceful Hand
Death Spell
Demi-Shadow Magic
Mirage Arcana
Mislead
Permanent Illusion
Programmed Illusion
Project Image
Reincarnation (Tekumel creatures only, of course) Shades
Veil

9th Level Spells

Astral Spell (Again, via Nexus Points, not the Astral Plane)

 

 

The Change Gods

Deity: Hru'u/Wuru

1st Level Spells

Chill Touch
Color Spray
Protection from Evil (Protection from Stability ONLY)

4th Level Spells

Confusion
Dig
Evard's Black Tentacles
Ice Storm
Illusionary Wall
Phantasmal Killer
Shadow Monsters
Vacancy
Wall of Ice
Unluck

7th Level Spells

Duo-Dimension
Limited Wish
Statue
Acid Storm

2nd Level Spells

Blindness
Darkness, 15' radius
Deafness
Fog Cloud
Stinking Cloud
Ray of Enfeeblement
Maximillian's Earthly Grasp

5th Level Spells

Advanced Illusion
Chaos
Cloudkill
Cone of Cold
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Domination
Dream (Nightmare only)
Feeblemind
Passwall
Sending
Shadow Magic
Transmute Rock to Mud
Mind Fog

8th Level Spells

Demand
Homunculous Shield

3rd Level Spells

Protection from Evil, 10' r (Protection from Stabiliy ONLY)
Slow
Spectral Force
Maximillian's Stony Grasp

6th Level Spells

Death Fog
Demi-Shadow Magic
Disintegrate
Eyebite
Mirage Arcana
Otiluke's Freezing Sphere
Mislead
Permanent Illusion
Programmed Illusion
Project Image
Shades
Veil
Lorlovelm's Shadowy Transformation

9th Level Spells

Weird
Wish

 

Deity: Vimuhla/Chiteng

1st Level Spells

Affect Normal Fires
Burning Hands
Enlarge (No reverse)
Fire Burst

4th Level Spells

Enchanted Weapon
Emotion (Courage, Hope only)
Fire Shield
Fire Trap
Fumble
Wall of Fire

7th Level Spells

Delayed Blast Fireball
Mordenkainen's Sword
Molec-Keth's Flame Fist

2nd Level Spells

Flaming Sphere
Fog Cloud
Mirror Image
Pyrotechnics
Shatter
Stinking Cloud

5th Level Spells

Cloudkill

8th Level Spells

Incendiary Cloud

3rd Level Spells

Fireball
Flame Arrow
Haste
Melf's Minute Meteors
Augmentation

6th Level Spells

Death Fog
Disintegrate
Tenser's Transformation
Forest's Fiery Constructor

9th Level Spells

Meteor Swarm
Elemental Aura (Fire only)

 

Deity: Ksarul/Gruganu

1st Level Spells

Alarm
Audible Glamer
Comprehend Languages (Reversal permitted)
Erase
Identify
Mending
Message
Nystul's Magic Aura
Ventriloquism

4th Level Spells

Detect Scrying
Rary's Mnemonic Enhancer
Extension I
Dilation I
Far Reaching II
Minor Spell Turning
Shadow Monsters

7th Level Spells

Contingency
Death Fog
Extension III
Glassee
Legend Lore
Mordenkainen's Lucubration
Shades
Augmentation II
Dilation II

2nd Level Spells

Fog Cloud
Forget
Leomund's Trap
Locate Object (Reverse okay)
Mirror Image
Misdirection
Spectral Hand
Stinking Cloud
Summon Swarm (Insects only)
Whispering Wind
Nahal's Nonsensical Nullifier
Past Life Sense
Shifting

5th Level Spells

Cloudkill
Contact Other Plane
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Domination
Extension II
False Vision
Leomund's Lamentable Belaborment
Leomund's Secret Chest
Magic Jar
Sending
Shadow Door
Wall of Iron
Lower Resistance
Von Gasik's Refusal

8th Level Spells

Maze
Screen
Symbol

3rd Level Spells

Delude (Ignoble to use)
Explosive Runes
Leomund's Tiny Hut
Non-detection
Hold Undead
Illusionary Script
Secret Page
Sepia Snake Sigil
Slow Tongues (Reverse okay)
Alacrity
Alamir's Fundamental Breakdown
Far Reaching I
Fool's Speech
Lorlovelm's Creeping Shadow
Squaring the Circle

6th Level Spells

Contingency
Death Fog
Extension III
Glassee
Legend Lore
Mordenkainen's Lucubration
Shades
Augmentation II
Dilation II

9th Level Spells

Time Stop
Chain Contingeny

 

Deity: Sarku/Durritlamish

1st Level Spells

Chill Touch
Detect Undead
Spook

4th Level Spells

Confusion
Contagion
Emotion (Fear only)
Enervation
Fear
Illusionary Wall
Vacancy
Mask of Death

7th Level Spells

Control Undead
Finger of Death
Bloodstone's Frightful Joining
Suffocate

2nd Level Spells

Scare
Spectral Hand
Stinking Cloud

5th Level Spells

Advanced Illusion
Bigby's Interposing Hand
Cloudkill
Domination
Feeblemind
Magic Jar
Shadow Magic
Wall of Stone
Mind Fog

8th Level Spells

Clone
Sink
Abi-Dalzim's Horrid Wilting

3rd Level Spells

Feign Death
Hold Undead
Slow
Spectral Force
Vampiric Touch
Wraithform
Minor Malison

6th Level Spells

Bigby's Forceful Hand
Death Fog
Demi-Shadow Magic
Mirage Arcana
Mislead
Permanent Illusion
Programmed Illusion
Project Image
Repulsion
Veil

9th Level Spells

Crystalbrittle
Energy Drain
Imprisonment

 

Deity: Dlamelish/Hrihayal

1st Level Spells

Change Self
Charm Person
Enlarge (Reverse ONLY)
Friends
Hypnotism
Taunt
Ventriloquism
Wall of Fog

4th Level Spells

Charm Monster
Emotion (Happiness, Hate, Hopelessness, Sadness only)
Fire Charm
Fumble
Illusionary Wall
Rainbow Pattern
Shadow Monsters
Solid Fog
Vacancy
Greater Malison

7th Level Spells

Bigby's Grasping Hand
Suffocate

2nd Level Spells

Alter Self
Fog Cloud
Fool's Gold
Glitterdust
Hypnotic Pattern
Irritation
Insatiable Thirst

5th Level Spells

Advanced Illusion
Bigby's Interposing Hand
Demi-Shadow Monsters
Hold Monster
Leomund's Lamentable Belaborment
Seeming
Shadow Magic
Mind Fog

8th Level Spells

Antipathy/Sympathy
Mass Charm
Otto's Irresistable Dance

3rd Level Spells

Hold Person
Slow
Spectral Force
Suggestion
Minor Malison

6th Level Spells

Bigby's Forceful Hand
Demi-Shadow Magic
Mass Suggestion
Mirage Arcana
Mislead
Permanent Illusion
Programmed Illusion
Project Image
Shades
Veil

9th Level Spells

Mordenkainen's Disjunction

 

 

 

Deity: Shaman

1st Level Spells

Find Familiar (Small natural Tekumel animals only)
Grease
Jump
Spider Climb
Murdock's Feathery Flyer

4th Level Spells

Massmorph
Minor Creation
Plant Growth
Polymorph Other
Polymorph Self
Solid Fog

7th Level Spells

Charm Plants

2nd Level Spells

Fog Cloud
Summon Swarm (Modify animals to small Tekumel creatures)
Web Ride the Wind

5th Level Spells

Animal Growth
Fabricate
Major Creation
Stone Shape
Waveform

8th Level Spells

Polymorph Any Object
Airboat

3rd Level Spells

Water Breathing (Reverse okay)
Watery Double

6th Level Spells

Conjure Animals (Similar Tekumel creatures)

9th Level Spells

Shape Change

 

Some spells have been removed from the game, such as all of the Summon Monster spells. These are spells that I feel don't fit the Tekumel universe. Add new spells as you see fit; here are some guidelines that I used to choose where they belong.

  1. In general, the higher level a spell is, the more restricted to one deity it is likely to be.
  2. I used the Swords and Glory list to guide me in which temples specialized in which kinds of magic. My list above should give you plenty of hints, too.
  3. Try to keep spells consistent. If illusion spells are generally found in the temples of Hnalla, Belkhanu, Hru'u, Sarku, and Dlamelish, don't put an illusion spell in Ksarul's list for no reason.
  4. No spells involving monster summoning or creation, Elementals, or specific other planes are included, nor are spells that depend on wild magic randomness for their effects.

Using the Swords and Glory/Gardasiyal Magic System

I made only minor modifications to the S&G magic system to speed play and provide a better fit. (The Gardasiayal rules are a simplifed Swords and Glory system.)

S&G casting times were modified to fit the AD&D combat round. S&G turns become AD&D rounds, while S&G rounds become AD&D segments. Notice that S&G spell durations were not modified: an S&G turn stays an AD&D turn, and an S&G round stays an AD&D round.

Sorcerers casting aimed spells must roll-to-hit as in S&G, but they use the Priest THAC0 of their level to give them a chance of actually hitting a target. Wizard THAC0s are just too awful. Gardasiyal dispenses with this in favor of a simple "success/failure" casting roll.

In AD&D, spells can be cast with little chance of failure, but the target gets a saving throw. In S&G, this is reversed: targets rarely get a saving throw, but there is a large chance of spell failure. Targets defend themselves by dodging or taking cover, which doesn't work well in an AD&D system. I used this system:

    1. Sorcerer rolls for spell failure.
    2. If the spell is an aimed spell, the sorcerer rolls to hit, using the THAC0 as if the sorcerer were a Cleric. Divide the spell range into thirds for short, medium, and long range, and use the normal AD&D to hit modifications.
    3. If the S&G spell description permits a spell-resistance roll, the victim gets a saving throw. If the spell is areal (area effect), the victim also gets a saving throw, even if the S&G spell description doesn't indicate one.

S&G sorcerers are more powerful than AD&D wizards, especially at lower levels, due to their ability to cast more spells, and more variety of spells. I modified the spell-point system to limit lower-level sorcerers so that they would be weaker, to preserve play balance. This table should also be used for Gardasiyal, which also permits low-level sorcerers to cast a lot of spells.

Spell Casting Costs: For sorcerers of 7th level or higher, the table found in S&G, section 2.932, is used without modification. Lower level sorcerers must pay higher costs to cast spells, as shown below:

 

Level 1

P/R

Level 2

P/R

Level 3

P/R

Level 4

P/R

Level 5

P/R

Level 6

P/R

U1 90/80 90/80 70/65 50/45 40/35 30/25
U2 170/160 110/100 90/80 60/55 50/45 40/35
U3   130/120 110/100 70/65 60/55 50/45
U4     130/120 90/80 70/65 60/55
U5       110/100 90/80 70/65
U6           90/80
U7           110/100
G1   100/90 80/75 50/45 50/45 40/35
G2     100/90 60/55 60/55 50/45
G3       70/65 70/65 60/55
G4           70/65
T1     100/95 80/75 70/65 60/55
T2       90/85 80/75 70/65
Te           80/75

 

Healing Spells

If non-weapon proficiencies are used, then healing spells should not be automatically effective, as there will be alternative methods of healing. Use the normal chances of healing spell failure, as found in S&G description of the spell 10, Healing. If non-weapon proficiencies are not used, healing spells always work, as in AD&D.

Psionics

I don't have the 2nd edition psionics rules, and I'd just as soon not bother with them. Tekumelani magic does distinguish between ritual and psychic magic, so "spells" could be considered ritual magic and "psionics" as psychic magic. There seems to be little effort to differentiate the two types of magic beyond their casting requirements, so there seems to be no justification for a separate Psionicist class. Some sorcerers are only capable of ritual magic, and others are only capable of psychic magic, but most sorcerers seem to be capable of both. Warriors are not taught sorcery, so there would be no warriors capable of psionics. I don't know enough about the 2nd edition psionic system, but it sounds like it would need a lot of modification to make it feel Tekumelani. I leave it up to the interested reader to devise a system

 

 

For the DM Only (an abbreviated DMG)

1. Non-friendly Non-humans These races may NOT be used for player characters, but they make useful NPCs and foes.

Neutral Races

Mihalli: +1 Str, +1 Int, +2 Dex, +1 Con, base AC 10, 1 HD. Can change shape, humans have a 20% chance to recognize a Mihalli by its eyes. Mihalli motives are incomprehensible to humans; this is best simulated by totally random behavior.

Nyagga: +2 Str, +1 Int, +2 Dex, base AC 8, 2 HD. Cannot remain out of water for more than 3 hours, lose 50% of dexterity and movement ability on land.

Inimical Races

Hluss: +1 Dex, base AC 8, 2 HD. May use middle limbs as tearing weapons and may attack with paralyzing sting in tail. They give off a sweet odor detectable at 90-120 feet.

Hlutrgu: +1 Dex, +1 Con, base AC 10, 2 HD. Never check morale, disorganized fighters.

Shunned Ones: +2 Con, base AC 10, 2 HD. -3 to Con when they are outside of their special atmosphere. Their stench is noticeable 180 feet away and may cause a morale check in humans. They cannot survive more than a week outside of their atmosphere.

Grey Ssu: +1 Str, base AC 10, 2 HD. Can see in the dark, 20% of hypnotizing opponents instead of attacking (Save vs. paralysis, magical attack adjustment from Wisdom applies) (Note that Ahoggya, Swamp Folk, and Tinaliya are immune to this hypnosis). May attack twice per round at only -1 penalty on second attack if they use their middle limbs. They are never lost underground. If they have no leader, they will become demoralized and retreat.

Black Ssu: +3 Str, +1 Con, -2 Dex, base AC 8, 3 HD. Two attacks per round without penalty. 10% chance per round of hypnotizing, +2 on opponents saving throw. If they have no leader, they will retreat. Ssu hypnotism abilities may be considered more like a Charm Person spell than a Hypnosis spell: no "suggestions" are needed, and the Ssu doesn't have to speak the victim's language to make them do things. People charmed by the Ssu may be ordered to kill themselves—they get an extra saving throw, but if they fail, they will commit suicide. Similarly, charmed persons may be ordered to attack friends (and they get the extra saving throw).

The Mihalli, the Hluss, the Shunned Ones, and the Ssu are all fearsome sorcerers, exceeding human abilities in most cases. Parties of these creatures will usually have wizards and clerics as well as warriors. There is no level restriction for them. Choose their spells from any of the deities of Change (but don't mix deities for the same spell-caster!)

Other monsters

EPT has a list of creatures that can be updated to AD&D standards fairly easily. If you don't have EPT, the Tekumel Bestiary will give you descriptions of the common fauna, and you can use the listed stats to get some idea of relative strengths, combat abilities, etc. In spite of the numbers of AD&D monsters out there, I can't think of any that easily fit into Tekumel, and certainly not enough to populate the world and make it feel real.

Treasure and other items

If you have the EPT rules, you can ignore all AD&D magical treasures..

If you insist on not buying any Tekumel-specific information (or can't find any), you can fudge a little by some AD&D treasure items. They must be modified, however:

1. Magic items. Tekumel has no wands, rods, magic staffs, rings, or potions. Instead of wands, rods, or staves, call them "Eyes": small techno-magical devices about the size and shape of a human eye, with an iris in the front and a tiny firing stud at the back. Sometimes Eyes are labeled by the prior owners as to what they do (and the language may be something the owner doesn't know) and sometimes they have indicators to show how many charges they have left. Eyes cannot normally be recharged except by The Thoroughly Useful Eye, which is rather uncommon and very valuable. If you want to recharge them as you would a wand, be my guest. Incidentally, Eyes are non-metallic, so a Wizard may carry them without fear. With the exception of enchanted armor or weapons (which can be pretty close to the standard AD&D list) all other magic items are miscellaneous and unique; each one is either a one-of a kind item, or there are a handful of them, all made by the same wizard.

2. There are magic scrolls. They aren't written in any "magic" language, although there is no guarantee that the holder will be able to understand the language it is written in! Priests of Ksarul and Sarku each have their own secret languages known only to high-level priests (and wizards) of their temple; all of the worshippers of stability have a single, similar language. There are also many foreign languages, and ancient languages, too. Magic books are also commonly written in these strange and little-known tongues (with effects equivalent to the Tome of Understanding, the Manual of Dexterity, etc.). Notice that high-level magic scrolls are commonly enchanted so that no matter what language they are written in, only a member of the same temple that penned the scroll can read it.

3. Gold pieces are called Kaitars, and they are physically small and light enough that you can carry plenty of them. (They are abbreviated as "K", rather than G.P.) There are 20 silver Hlash to the Kaitar, and 20 copper Qirgal to the Hlash. For large sums, people carry "letters of credit"; letters of financial support from the clan. You can imagine a letter to be the equivalent of a bank passbook drawn on the clan's account, but the clan limits the amount each letter of credit is worth.

 

Afterward

That should suffice to allow you to play Tekumel, using more or less standard AD&D rules. Best of luck with your game, and please let me know if the rules worked and if your players liked them. Of course, Tekumel is the creation of Professor M.A.R. Barker, and AD&D is the creation of Gary Gygax and TSR Rules.

--Robert Dushay Rdushay@mindspring.com